Best Exercises for Paddlers: Workouts for Before & During Floating

Rowing, canoeing and kayaking require upper body and core strength, along with some amount of endurance. With a little planning, preparing physically for your next watercraft outing, or deliberately maximizing the amount of exercise you get while on water-themed trips, can be achieved as well as be rewarding.

When in doubt, work with a personal trainer or canoe/kayak club coach to establish a customized training program.

Kayaks Versus Canoes: Ultimate Pros and Cons Comparison

To float for relaxation or exhilaration is an ongoing question for outdoor adventurers. The traditionally held view is that canoes are for recreation and kayaks are meant for thrills! Yet, many outdoor enthusiasts have, or use, both types of these vessels. Current hybrid kayak models also are closing the gap between these popular water-trip boats. A comparison of the two comes down to analyzing the sort of water experiences sought and what features are needed to support the type of trip planned.

“Twenty years ago, family canoeing was big, but kayaks have become more popular recently, as not as many people are going on overnight or multi-day floating trips,” explains Jason Russell, manager of Ozark Mountain Trading Company’s Southwest Missouri store in Ozark, Mo.

How Not to Contribute to Stream Bank Erosion While Canoeing

As stewards of Missouri’s water and soil, canoe fans can take care not to add pressure or problems to fragile waterways and environments they enjoy using. Following are tips about how to not inadvertently damage waterways during canoe trips.

Missouri’s waterways still face erosion challenges that began more than a century ago. In the 1930s, Americans realized how devastating soil erosion could be as the Dust Bowl swept across the nation, relocating an estimated 300 million tons of soil. According to Department of Natural Resources statistics, Missouri had the highest rate of erosion in the United States, which led to the creation of the Missouri Soil and Water Conservation Districts in 1943. In 1982, Missouri was still losing soil at a rate of 10.8 tons per acre each year on cultivated cropland. Landowner voluntary efforts and structured cost-share conservation programs collectively have helped to slow erosion across the state since that time.

20 Best Games to Play For Fun While Canoeing

In addition to having fun, playing games while canoeing can lead to increased paddling and maneuvering skills, as well as more teamwork, trust, leadership, communication and entertainment. Games also enhance one’s canoe-related observational and concentration abilities. An important consideration, however, is how competitive, cooperative or creative the games should be, given various proficiencies, health conditions or ages of those with you.

How many of the following compilation of canoe games have you tried?

Don’t Rock the Boat: Etiquette on Missouri’s Rivers

Everyday millions of Americans fight congested roadways in order to get to work, often experiencing road rage from fellow drivers. This is the very thing families try to escape when taking a float trip on Missouri’s rivers which made us stop and wonder, are there ways to avoid boat rage on the river? No matter how hard we try to be courteous on roadways, conflicts are inevitable and similar situations can arise when lots of canoes, kayaks, rafts and power boats congest the river on peak weekends. Here are some suggestions to prevent conflicts with other boaters on Missouri’s rivers.

An Open Letter to Pat Sutcliffe at MissouriCanoe.org

Name: Pat Sutcliffe

Email: pat@canoemissouri.com

Customer Comments:

As an advertiser on Float Missouri I was wondering if you might consider asking the people who maintain the site to put a retraction on the “real funny joke” they posted yesterday?  It is causing tremendous problems.

It didn’t end up being very funny for the canoeing industry in Missouri.

Thanks!

Pat Sutcliffe

This letter was sent to one of our advertisers after our New Alcohol Law Targets Floaters April Fools post gained, let’s just say, a little attention. Below is my response to Mr./Mrs. Sutcliffe.